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Download Epub » Hellblazer The Devil You Know í 264 pages Õ Jamie delano · This volume features some of Constantine's earliest adventures by writer Jamie Delano including his first victory in the long war with the demon Nergal and an encounter with a strange woman who is the embodiment oRs painted by V FOR VENDETTA co creator David LloydCollects Hellblazer #10 13 Hellblazer Annual and The Horrorist #1 Boy howdy is this trippy and certainly different from the down to earth take that Garth Ennis and Warren Ellis brought to Hellblazer One of the stories here has been reprinted in the Rare Cuts anthology featuring stories through the comic's entire run The one detailing the Newcastle Incident which ended up traumatising John Constantine psychologically for the rest of his life to the point of still being brought up in new stories to this day It's also by far the most conventional story found here whatever that means by the standards of later Hellblazer comicsThe Devil You Know is full of acidhead cosmic mysticism a storyline riffing on William Gibson style cyberpunk where Constantine takes on a demon infesting a computer mainframe complete with holographic virtual realities that are clearly modelled on mid 1980s computer game graphics lots of neon fluorescent psychedelic colours and best of all a storyline that's a flashback to the swords and sorcery exploits of an Iron Age Celt ancestor of John Constantine In that one the genre shifts completely to Robert E Howard style heroic fantasy and is as a matter of fact a very competent entry in the genreAs you can imagine the content of this paperback is extremely 1980s almost reaching the same acute levels of I can't believe it's not a parody as early editions of Warhammer I already mentioned the storyline that put an occult fantasy spin on the virtual realities described in Wm Gibson's Burning Chrome and Neuromancer but there are also constant references to political events of the day most notably the Falklands War and an in story music video by a post punk band that John Constantine sung in that's basically one 80s music video cliché after another This very much comes across as the kind of comics that Carl MacCoy and Jaz Coleman probably read in their spare time back then Come to think of it even the arc about the Iron Age warlord fits into how heroic fantasy was a uite popular genre during the 1980s see also the films Conan the Barbarian and Excalibur This has a real everything and the kitchen sink feel that's often absent from newer Constantine comics I've read and also way weirder I didn't uite know what to make of the Horrorist arc which is probably the longest myself as it features by far the most experimental writing but it has some amazingly eerie high contrast artwork The story itself also predicts the entire black eyed child mythos that has been making the rounds in Forteanparanormal circles as alleged real life entities in recent years Not all of the stories here really clicked for me but you can't accuse Jamie Delano for lacking in audacity

Hellblazer The Devil You KnowRs painted by V FOR VENDETTA co creator David LloydCollects Hellblazer #10 13 Hellblazer Annual and The Horrorist #1 Boy howdy is this trippy and certainly different from the down to earth take that Garth Ennis and Warren Ellis brought to Hellblazer One of the stories here has been reprinted in the Rare Cuts anthology featuring stories through the comic's entire run The one detailing the Newcastle Incident which ended up traumatising John Constantine psychologically for the rest of his life to the point of still being brought up in new stories to this day It's also by far the most conventional story found here whatever that means by the standards of later Hellblazer comicsThe Devil You Know is full of acidhead cosmic mysticism a storyline riffing on William Gibson style cyberpunk where Constantine takes on a demon infesting a computer mainframe complete with holographic virtual realities that are clearly modelled on mid 1980s computer game graphics lots of neon fluorescent psychedelic colours and best of all a storyline that's a flashback to the swords and sorcery exploits of an Iron Age Celt ancestor of John Constantine In that one the genre shifts completely to Robert E Howard style heroic fantasy and is as a matter of fact a very competent entry in the genreAs you can imagine the content of this paperback is extremely 1980s almost reaching the same acute levels of I can't believe it's not a parody as early editions of Warhammer I already mentioned the storyline that put an occult fantasy spin on the virtual realities described in Wm Gibson's Burning Chrome and Neuromancer but there are also constant references to political events of the day most notably the Falklands War and an in story music video by a post punk band that John Constantine sung in that's basically one 80s music video cliché after another This very much comes across as the kind of comics that Carl MacCoy and Jaz Coleman probably read in their spare time back then Come to think of it even the arc about the Iron Age warlord fits into how heroic fantasy was a uite popular genre during the 1980s see also the films Conan the Barbarian and Excalibur This has a real everything and the kitchen sink feel that's often absent from newer Constantine comics I've read and also way weirder I didn't uite know what to make of the Horrorist arc which is probably the longest myself as it features by far the most experimental writing but it has some amazingly eerie high contrast artwork The story itself also predicts the entire black eyed child mythos that has been making the rounds in Forteanparanormal circles as alleged real life entities in recent years Not all of the stories here really clicked for me but you can't accuse Jamie Delano for lacking in audacity

Text ✓ Hellblazer The Devil You Know Ò Jamie Delano

Hellblazer The Devil You Know Ü This volume features some of Constantine's earliest adventures by writer Jamie Delano including his first victory in This was hit and miss than volume 1 IMO but I still loved uite a lot of it and liked nearly all You know you've found an author you connect with when the middling to negative reviews are criticising things you consider good features not bugs Volume 2 is an odd compilation made up of four single issue comics #10 13 from late 1988 a 1989 annual which if it was like 80s annuals for innocent kids' publications means produced in late 1988 and The Horrorist a two issue special from 1995 by which time Jamie Delano had stopped writing the main Hellblazer series I rather like the psychedelic type seuences in 10 and 12 of astral travel and being disembodied inside the 'electronic reality' the early internet though it's clear from reviews that they aren't to every reader's taste But how much notice should I even be taking of all the 3 star reviews when there is a silent majority giving these collections ratings of 4 5 stars? Whilst I liked the concepts and writing I thought the artist was inevitably struggling to represent on a flat plane adventures and aspects of consciousness which would feel three dimensional and movement based and be easier to convey in animation what is here often feels like mere hints and prompts for your imagination to run with if it's your sort of thingHere it was easy to be reminded of that widely discussed comics topic of the 2010s minor characters who die to fuel the story of the white male hero and reflect how tedious that must have got when that was almost all there was to read and watch Set alongside recent slightly diverse superhero movies where even if heroes are from different backgrounds anonymous extras and minions are always dying in the background it begins to look like a fundamental problem of individual and collective that is only ever partially resolvable via even representation because most adventure stories are about individuals The Newcastle incident is central to Constantine's backstory yet I've been wondering after reading #11 if the way it happened was a little too convoluted that he was there on tour with his old band yet when it all happened he had turned up at the club with several other people too On the one hand there can be convoluted backstories to real things and I like the realism of writers trying to reflect that But when you are trying to tell a story in so few words perhaps a layer of that sort of thing needs to be edited out? At time of reading I was curious about who Alan Moore or Jamie Delano introduced 'Newcastle' as the big scary thing in Constantine's backstory and why I've now seen it's in Swamp Thing 46 1985 where the incident was said to have happened last year rather than in 1978 as it became in Hellblazer I wanted to know if there was any reason he chose that city the one that of all the major UK regional cities seems to get least national attention and to be in an abstract sense remote from most of the famous parts of the North still over a hundred miles further south including Constantine's birthplace Liverpool But it was simple enough it turns out because Constantine's appearance was based on Sting and Sting was from Newcastle The city was part of the character's origin story even though he wasn't from there himself an example of how writers transpose real things to create charactersI liked the way that through these issues Delano was either creating visual ciphers for the character's dark memories or showing a sense of him feeling taunted by the world via the cans of Newcastle Brown Ale that keep appearing You wonder if they always actually were Newkie Brown or if they are a reflection of Constantine worrying that beer cans and bottles will turn out to be it because he doesn't want to see it or if he's thinking that one he sees out of the corner of his eye is it when it might actually be something elseBut with the Newcastle incident suddenly so increased in its impact in issue 11 compared to the brief sardonically calm allusion in Swamp Thing the apparent resolution in issue #12 ends up feeling rather unearned There isn't a long narrative build up to show what it's been like for him being stuck with a probably unresolvable horrendous fate for ten years even if there is something in the annual and why would you read that between #11 and #12? nor how long he must have thought about some of what he does in #12 The panels on the concluding page are a curious mixture of capturing what it does feel like to be rid of something after a long period of struggle and the kind of self help talk that assumes all problems are inside the individual and not partly external Which now that problem of therapy and self help culture is widely acknowledged is odd to find in rather a political comic I s'pose I should feel sorrier for him than I do but right now all I really feel is a sort of empty light headed relief It's as if the coils of a huge constricting snake that's been sueezing the life out of me for the past ten years had slipped away and I can breathe againFor the first time since Newcastle when I poisoned myself with a stupid lust for power I'm conscious of standing on the brink of future rather than the tail of pastI sought out my demon and conuered him now if this species is going to have any chance of survival we all have to face the demons inside usWe have to turn inwards Enter the siege perilous and wrestle It's not those grotesue tired institutions of heaven and hell that are the problem It's the devils we knowMy favourite panels of writing in this collection follow shortly after that near the beginning of Constantine's wandering at the seaside in #13 describing childhood memories of a funfair ride We reeled out over the crowds on the spider Vision smeared by G force streaking through galaxies of gaudy light intoxicated by the hot dog air That's the sort of stuff I love in Delano's writing where it hits exactly the right notes to be powerfully evocative and poetic every word doing something but it's not overdoing it either Another panel I particularly liked was where it looks as if somebody else Delano? Constantine? Both? enjoyed Jonathan Livingston Seagull than you're supposed to admit to now I did but I don't think I've read it since I was a kid partly because I don't want to spoil it partly because I don't want the embarrassmentDelano loves metaphysical and dreamlike connections so as Constantine is still processing his return to Newcastle and his flawed destructive resolution of what happened there the character falls asleep and dreams about a verbal echo that common 1980s nightmare of the nuclear dystopia blighted ruination humans hoping to acuire gills doomed isolates trying to find hope in reproduction and producing only death and mutants The works The Cold War may have just ended but the nightmare idea remains in late 1988 in the presence of a nuclear power station across the bayFor me there's something that works very well about reading the now thoroughly processed collective anxieties of 30 years ago whether they are similar to the present or things now mostly out of mind whilst trying to hear as little as possible about those of 2020 Some reviewers have said these comics aren't funny which I can't fathom The bleakness the right sort of bleakness for me is punctuated every few pages by some pithy self aware line or stupid pun that makes me hoot with laughter these things being all the funnier in contrast to what is before and likely after I can almost feel the dopamine surging when these things are at the right freuencyIn the annual 'The Bloody Saint' Part One presents a rationale for Delano's writing style which is a nice touch to explain how this prose is attached to this character whom others might have given a hard boiled style to go with his trenchcoat He's psychologically fragile and of a hippie than would be assumed from his clothes And it must be intentional because Alan Moore who originally created Constantine in Swamp Thing nominated Delano to write the first Hellblazer comics Write it all down they said contain it make some sense of it But how can you make sense of the senseless or contain the seething universe? I found it interesting that making sense of was already such a key term psychologically in that context as I didn't become aware of it that way until twenty years after this were written A couple of pages later he's accepted it writing it down does channel the emotional rip tides and provide a few calm eddies for thought There's magic in the use of wordsNow I'm wondering if the trenchcoat and suit could be seen at first as an act as if a way to pass as and be reacted to as a different type of person and work towards becoming him of the time'The Bloody Saint' Part Two was a type of story I have a perennial weakness for a character had an ancestor hundreds of years ago with similar talents On top of that Konstantyn was a pagan Romano British warlord and sorceror holding out against Christianity and Delano pays better attention to the history of the period than plenty of authors who and Good Omens I'm looking at you here seem to think it's not possible to make semi humorous fantasy out of this era without dressing it up like the High Medieval when Mallory wrote Morte d'Arthur a la Python It's appropriately brutal and grubby and gnarled thanks to Bryan Talbot's art and despite being written 30 years ago fits well with current historical thinking on how conversion to Christianity was a political expedient for uite a lot of early medieval rulers Likewise Delano has noticed how some early medieval saints were merely those who were first and royal and far from good The way Konstantyn holds out against the new religion and eventually strategically decides to take it up was reminiscent of the Christianisation of Lithuania in the 14th century However despite certain visual absurdities and some of the connections with mythical characters that may or may not have been satirical this se Text ✓ Hellblazer The Devil You Know Ò Jamie Delano

Jamie Delano Ò Hellblazer The Devil You Know Epub

Jamie Delano Ò Hellblazer The Devil You Know Epub The long war with the demon Nergal and an encounter with a strange woman who is the embodiment of the world's horro This collection contains three flavors of nihilism for your self hating pleasure three tones of world weary disgust for your cynical comic book reading mindThe first selection is my least favorite Even though it seems like forever since I finished the previous Hellblazer collection the conclusion of the carrying over storyline still seems abrupt What really bothers me about this selection though is the art It seems Richard Piers Rayner is hell bent on depicting every stupid awkward obnoxious and just plain dumb facial expression the human body is capable of It's gross and embarrassing in a way undeserving of the gross tastes of HellblazerBryan Talbot's art however which serves to illustrate the first Hellblazer Annual is always satisfying in its putrid grotesueness and fits the rich coloring and accompanying story like a severed head to rusty pike This is also not coincidentally my favorite story of the lot though it is ugly and as mean spirited as the others there was something interesting in its portrayal of the fall of magic and rise of man Also the framing story involves 1980's British politics which I had no interest in whatsoever before reading Hellblazer gave me an entertaining perspective on the various injustices and eventsThe final piece to this triptych of a comic book collection is the first two issues of The Horrorist a limited series on Constantine illustrated beautifully by David Lloyd and my first introduction to John Constantine long long before I knew who he was The story here is an ugly one essentially the ultimate white guilt fable and even though it is self reverentially one it is no less bleakly self righteous or unappealingSomewhere around the middle of the Hororist I thought to myself Why am I reading this? This is gross and mean spirited and boring I am not enjoying myself I mean Constantine is constantly pratting on in some purple prosed manner why the world sucks and everybody sucks and the world is going to die because it sucks and etcetera Why not throw in a joke issue every now and then? Even the darkest melancholic has mediocre days every once in a while It's such a grim book it's grim to the point of devoiding and devaluing all other possible perspectives It is a book geared to put you in the ugliest frame of mind with no chance of recovery It is proselytizing on obvious uglies and evils of the world things most of us move beyond because there are other things out there but it does not show those other things It even adds made up carnage to stack the deck in its negative nelly view further In that way it is maudlin meaningless and not worth my timeI know I complain about smugness a lot on here but smugness in literature is one thing I can't stand Unless it is an obvious pulp story I hate to see broadly defined characters that are good and evil or opinions that are good or evil especially when the story in uestion represents itself to be held up to a higher standard than pulp This doesn't mean that I only like wishy washy literature but when a story has bad people I like it to be at least admitted that these people or opinions are bad only because of the limited scope of the protagonist who are uite reasonably indebted to their own views and not the limited scope of the actual author's mindHellblazer is relentlessly smug Everybody's a nitwit or a mother fucker or a hypocrite or a devil or a racist or a sniveling angel Everybody is guilty of something And Constantine is like Socrates calling everybody else out while admitting he's the worst one of all It's a cheap way to gain the reader's sympathy but it works until the constant purple prosed droning on the way life sucks and is shit becomes a pill And like a pill or a smart friend who is fun for a while until all his harping becomes a nagging annoyance I think Hellblazer is a novelty only good in small doses